Sum Excel Rows Based on Text

Most of the time, if you're summing cells in Excel, a simple SUM formula will do the job. In the example shown below, the SUM function calculates the total of hours worked each week.

The formula in cell B7 is:  =SUM(B2:B5)

sumhours

However, things aren't always so simple. You've probably seen worksheets like the one below, in which different kinds of values are mixed together. Instead of just employee hours, the worksheet also calculates the weekly cost per employee.

sumifwildcard01

Using the SUM Function

A common solution is to use the SUM function, and carefully select all the rows with hours.

sumifwildcard02

That solution might work in a short list, but it's an accident waiting to happen if you try to total a long list with this technique.

And even in a short list, you'll end up with errors if an employee's data is deleted from the list.

sumifwildcard04

Use the SUMIF Function

A better solution in this case is to use the SUMIF function. It sums the numbers in rows that meet a specific criterion.

=SUMIF(range to check , criteria, range to sum)

  • Row headings are in column A, so that is the range the SUMIF formula will check.
  • The total headings in A11 (Hours) or A12 (Cost) will be used to create the criteria.
  • With a SUMIF formula in cell C11, we can sum the hours in column C.

Note: If you have multiple criteria to check, use the SUMIFS function in Excel 2007 and later versions.

Wildcard in Criterion

The row headings won't exactly match the "Hours" criteria, because the headings start with the employee name, such as "Emp01 Hours".

However, the headings are consistent, and the endings match the total headings in A11 (Hours) or A12 (Cost).

  • In the rows with hours, the heading ends with "Hours"
  • In the rows with costs, the heading ends with "Cost"

The wildcard character – * – represents any characters, so the criterion "*Hours" would match any heading that ends with "Hours".

To total all the Hours rows in week 1, we could use this formula:

=SUMIF($A$2:$A$9 ,"*Hours" , C$2:C$9)

To make the formula more flexible, so it can be used in the Cost row too, we'll use a reference to the heading cell -- $A11 -- instead of hard-coding the "Hours" text.

=SUMIF($A$2:$A$9 ,"*" & $A11, C$2:C$9)

sumifwildcard03 

Copy the Formula to Remaining Total Cells

To finish the worksheet, the formula is copied across to column F, and copied down to row 12, where it calculates the total cost.

This formula has different types of references, so it can be safely copied down to the Cost total in row 12, and across to column F.

=SUMIF($A$2:$A$9,"*" & $A11, C$2:C$9)

  • $A$2:$A$9 – Absolute reference to the row headings in cells A2:A9. No matter where the formula is used, it should always check these cells for the criteria text.
  • $A11 – The column reference is absolute, so it always uses the criteria in column A of the total row. The row reference is relative, so it will change when the formula is copied down to row 12.
  • C$2:C$9—The column reference is relative, and will change as the formula is copied across to columns D, E and F. The rows are an absolute reference, and will continue to sum rows 2:9 when the formula is copied down to row 12

sumifwildcard05

More SUMIF Examples

For more SUMIF and SUMIFS examples, please visit the Excel SUM functions page on the Contextures website.

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19 comments to Sum Excel Rows Based on Text

  • Kurt

    >> To make the formula more flexible, so it can be used in the Cost row too, we'll use a reference to the heading cell -- $A11 -- instead of hard-coding the "Hours" text.

    >> =SUMIF($A$2:$A$9 ,"*" & $A11, C$2:C$9)

    shouldnt the efrence goto $A13 ??

  • Martin

    Wow, I would have added another column named Type, and used the same approach, just thinking that the next request could be for someone to ask for a Pivot Table....

  • Andy

    This is 'Excel'lent!!! It can be so annoying when you need to delete listed data.

  • Fiasco

    Hi. Tnx for the tutorial, but i ran into a problem.
    What would you do, if you needed to sum Emp05 Costs only for odd number weeks(week 1, week 3, week 5 etc.)?

  • Mahendra Rathor

    Great help to what I was trying to do.

    Many thanks

    Best regards

  • Farlwy

    How can I Sum only the latest 5 values in a row of many values that may have no value cells interspersed? The cells would be laid out in a time sequence.

  • Thanks for this quick help! I forgot an absolute value and was so frustrated because my formula was not carrying across the sheet. This was very easy to follow and translate to my usage.

  • Thank you thank you thank you! Excellent example of how this function works. It took me a while to find the perfect function.

  • beks

    Hello

    I have a question and need help please.

    Are you able to add a value to a box and have the sum/formula in that box which will times that number by a specified amount and give you the total?

    i.e. I want to times £23.00 by the number i add to the box, which will differ each month.

    not sure if this is even possible by any help gratefully received!

    Thanks in advance
    thanks
    Beks

  • Belks

    You would nee to use 2 cells, let's say cell A1 would contain the number that you would add and cell B1
    would contain the formula. This formula in B1 will work =IF((A1=""),"",A1*23) cell B1 will show nothing until a value has been put in cell A1

  • Guido van Es

    THANK YOOOOUUUUUUUU This helped a great deal!!! :-)

  • Leslie Charles

    You can also use a formula like =SUMIF($B$5:$B$42,B45,$D$5:$D$42)

    Suppose you have a long list with different categories. For example Rent, Utilities,
    Supplies, etc. There may be many different instances of each category (e.g., Jan Rent = $50, Feb Rent = $50 Jan Supplies = $500, Feb Supplies = $200 etc.). So, at the bottom of the long list you enter the categories then place the formula in an ajacent column and copy-down. If the sum of each category equals the sum of the long list then you are sure your spreadsheet is accurate.

  • Simon

    Thank you very much for this great explanation - I never write comments, but this helped me in a clear and concise way that was easy to implement. Cheers!

  • mark

    I am trying to sum four cells in a row for a completion report. The problem is the four rows represent four topics safety topics. I insert a 1 in each cell showing complete. To the right of the four cells is a cell showing completion %. I used a simple =sum formula/4 that works OK. Now I need to modify this to show a number reflecting date of hire. This would now reflect four columns with a unique number excusing the employee from completing the assigned reading and also showing completion % for dates other than start date. Sorry its so confusing. In other words, three of the four cells are part of a % formula excusing one cell as the start date?

  • Joe

    I have a spreadsheet of email addresses and want to count the number of times an email address appears in a row. Please assist, and many thanks.

    Joe

  • Dave Roberts

    Debra has a whole list of countif tutorials. One of these should help.
    http://www.contextures.com/xlFunctions04.html

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